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We wish  all our kind Readers a

very blessed Christmas!

Áldásos karácsonyi ünnepeket kívánunk minden kedves Olvasónknak 

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Rossz a Jézus kiscsizmája

According to this Christmas folksong, Baby Jesus' boots and sheepskin jacket are ragged, He is chilled to the bone.   "If I had little boots, I'd give them to Him, and cover Him with my sheepskin jacket.  Then He would lean to me, perhaps even kiss me. No one in the whole wide world would be happier than I." 

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Népdal/Folk Song

Az én kiscsizmám / My Little Boots

According to this Christmas folksong, Baby Jesus' boots and sheepskin jacket are ragged.  "If I had little boots, I'd give them to Him, and cover Him with my sheepskin jacket.  Then He would lean to me, perhaps even kiss me. No one in the whole wide world would be happier than I."

This song is the theme running through our Christmas story by Stolmár Ilona. 

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Stolmár Ilona

A Post-War Christmas, 1947

Mom and Erika at the window
A Post-War Christmas, 1947

We had left Budapest in December 1944, and by the grace of God, survived bombings, near-fatal sickness, and had just moved from Hannover to Essen, Germany.  Reason: Dad’s office, the British Control Commission for Germany, had just moved there.  My American Aunt Louise and Uncle Raul Vajk regularly sent us food and clothing packages from the US, literally keeping us alive, for which we could never thank them enough.

The following is taken from Dad’s “Family News”.  Despite our cramped quarters, the wonderful heat and the fact that Dad could come home every night meant a fantastic improvement in our quality of life. 

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Remig A. Papp

Christmas “Down Under”

To us, it reads like a Fourth of July celebration, with the same focus on food.  As in the United States, the religious meaning of the Christmas holiday seems to be lost in the hustle and bustle.  Someone has written  that in Australia, all so-called red letter holidays have been “genetically modified”!  Another Hungarian immigrant complains that only by the promise of food and gifts can her grandchildren be lured out of the pool on Christmas Day.

Judy explained that when her family arrived in Australia in 1949, her parents wanted to assimilate into the local society, and therefore did not mix with other Hungarian immigrants.  The only Hungarian Christmas custom they retained was her mother’s baking of torta and beigli. But she still has “a strong sentimental attachment to Hungary, especially the history.  I have written about my family history and visited relevant sites in Hungary.  Fortunately, I have never forgotten the language and get a great deal of satisfaction from speaking it when in Hungary, even though my vocabulary is limited.”  She ended her message with “Kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket kívánok!” 

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Judy Calman