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Hungary Past and Present

The Irredenta Sculptures

Map of Hungary as dismembered by the Treaty of Trianon, formerly in the middle of Szabadság tér. (Source: Metropolitan Szabó Ervin Library, Budapest. Used by permission)
The Irredenta Sculptures

Irredenta” is defined as a region that is related ethnically or historically to one country but is controlled politically by another.  The territories lost in the Trianon Peace Treaty represented by the four irredentist sculptures were assigned to the four points of the compass.

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Éva Wajda

Long-Term Effects of Trianon: Szelmenc, a Village Cut in Half
When the Treaty of Trianon dismembered Hungary in 1920, giving away 71% of the country's territory - despite the fact that the Hungarian delegate was the ONLY one who had opposed going to war! - the borders were drawn arbitrarily.  Those lost territories became political footballs that could be tossed whichever way the whim of the great powers dictated.  The will of the population - the much-touted "self-determination of peoples" principle - was totally ignored. 
And those border changes had far-reaching effects on the inhabitants, lasting to our own days, as illustrated by the story of Szelmenc.
In this 100th anniversary year of the dictated Treaty of Trianon, we are rerunning this article which we had originally published in June 2015. 
 
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Erika Papp Faber

August 2-15, 1933: 4th World Jamboree in Gödöllő

Jamboree emblem worn by every participant
August 2-15, 1933: 4th World Jamboree in Gödöllő

The Scouting movement, begun by Robert S.S. Baden-Powell in England in 1907, was enthusiastically embraced by some Hungarians as a wonderful tool for character building and citizenship training for youth, championing the nation’s spiritual revival. Thus by 1912, the Hungarian Scout Association was founded as the Magyar Cserkész Szövetség. Although others regarded the movement as suspiciously militaristic, and it was attacked because of its espousal of the traditional values of family, Church and country, by 1933 it had proved itself to such an extent that Hungary was named to host the 4th International Scouting Jamboree.

The story is told of the Exploratory Committee coming to Budapest, which was in the running for hosting the 1933 Jamboree, although the members seemed to favor Prague. My grandfather, dr. Papp Antal, a Hungarian-Armenian, was at the time President of the Hungarian Scouts, and was the one who welcomed them.  Two Armenians were on the Committee, and when my Grandfather wrote his name in Armenian script, that supposedly tilted the scales in Hungary’s favor.

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Erika Papp Faber