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Header: Crowning of St. Stephen by Bishop St. Asztrik, by Mellocco Miklós,
Esztergom, dedicated in 2001 (from Tripadvisor, used by permission) 

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St. Stephen - August 20th

St. Stephen's statue at Hősök tere (Heroes' Square), Budapest. (Photo by Karolina Tima Szabo)
St. Stephen - August 20th

This is a translation of a meditation published last year on the napi e-vangélium website. Used by permission.

 

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Rev. Horváth István Sándor

Urban Legends about Szt. István / St. Stephen

Upon his crowning with the crown sent by Pope Sylvester II in the year 1000, Szent István király (King St. Stephen) turned from his people’s ancient pagan customs, making Christianity the foundation of the new state.  He organized the land into counties and established dioceses, setting up the framework for administering the new nation.  Many are the legends concerning his life and reign, and many misconceptions also have been circulated about him.  Here is a handful of these, with their refutations.

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Anni Oroszlány

American-Hungarian Community

Sándor Teszler

The Hungarian version of “One good turn deserves another” is “Jó tett helyébe jót várj” – You should expect good in return for a good deed.  Sándor Teszler experienced the truth of this saying – it literally saved his life!

 

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Charles Bálintitt Jr.

Obituaries

On May 16th, Rev. Stephen Bálint went home to his Maker, and four days later, on May 20th, Abbot Denis Farkasfalvy, O.Cist. followed him. 

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Celebrating 10 Years of History

We publish this article from the September 2002 issue of our predecessor publication, the printed Magyar News because of its connection with Abbot Denis Farkasfalvy, who died in May.  See his obituary elsewhere in this issue.

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Erika Papp Faber

Magyar News Classics

June 4, 1920 Peace(?) Treaty of Trianon
The original article was printed in the 2006 July-August issue of Magyar News See the full story...

Arts and Culture

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Magyar Treasures: The Hungarian Parliament Building

A river view of Parliament
Magyar Treasures: The Hungarian Parliament Building

In continuing our series, we present one of the most famous landmarks recognized by every tourist who ever visited Hungary.  But few are aware that the Parliament building’s height of 96 meters is the same as the height of the Basilica of St. Stephen, symbolizing the equal power of the State and the Church.  (By law, no building may be taller than 96 meters.) 

 

Another interesting facet of the Parliament is its heating and cooling system, which was considered one of the most modern at the time of construction.  A separate building housed the boilers which produced hot steam that was then distributed throughout the building by a system of tele-heating.  Originally, cool air streamed into the building through the basins of two water fountains, later replaced by several tons of ice in two large shafts.  Modernization in 2011 brought a rerouting of pipes, and heating and cooling are now handled via computer.  Changing the air in the legislative chamber is accomplished by gravitation, by means of drainpipes placed in the floor. 

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Judit Vasmatics Paolini

Saga of the Miraculous Stag / Rege a Csodaszarvasról
Saga of the Miraculous Stag / Rege a Csodaszarvasról

This is one of the basic Hungarian national legends.  It was used as the symbol of the 1933 Scouting Jamboree held in Hungary (see article elsewhere in this issue).  

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Karolina Tima Szabo

Hortobágyon
The region of the Great Plain known as Hortobágy elicits visions of summer, the reason we are running this poem and the article about it.  Here Szabolcska Mihály rhapsodizes about the beauty of the area. See the full story...
Szabolcska Mihály

Hortobágy

Csikós showing his prowess. (Photo by Zsuzsa Lengyel)
Hortobágy

This is a thumbnail sketch of the area of Hungary about which Szabolcska Mihály’s poem rhapsodizes. It seems a good topic for this summer issue.

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EPF

Sponge Cake Roll with Strawberry Filling
A nice early summer dessert, to make - and enjoy! - while quarantined! See the full story...
Karolina Tima Szabo

Hungary Past and Present

The Irredenta Sculptures

Map of Hungary as dismembered by the Treaty of Trianon, formerly in the middle of Szabadság tér. (Source: Metropolitan Szabó Ervin Library, Budapest. Used by permission)
The Irredenta Sculptures

Irredenta” is defined as a region that is related ethnically or historically to one country but is controlled politically by another.  The territories lost in the Trianon Peace Treaty represented by the four irredentist sculptures were assigned to the four points of the compass.

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Éva Wajda

Long-Term Effects of Trianon: Szelmenc, a Village Cut in Half
When the Treaty of Trianon dismembered Hungary in 1920, giving away 71% of the country's territory - despite the fact that the Hungarian delegate was the ONLY one who had opposed going to war! - the borders were drawn arbitrarily.  Those lost territories became political footballs that could be tossed whichever way the whim of the great powers dictated.  The will of the population - the much-touted "self-determination of peoples" principle - was totally ignored. 
And those border changes had far-reaching effects on the inhabitants, lasting to our own days, as illustrated by the story of Szelmenc.
In this 100th anniversary year of the dictated Treaty of Trianon, we are rerunning this article which we had originally published in June 2015. 
 
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Erika Papp Faber

August 2-15, 1933: 4th World Jamboree in Gödöllő

Jamboree emblem worn by every participant
August 2-15, 1933: 4th World Jamboree in Gödöllő

The Scouting movement, begun by Robert S.S. Baden-Powell in England in 1907, was enthusiastically embraced by some Hungarians as a wonderful tool for character building and citizenship training for youth, championing the nation’s spiritual revival. Thus by 1912, the Hungarian Scout Association was founded as the Magyar Cserkész Szövetség. Although others regarded the movement as suspiciously militaristic, and it was attacked because of its espousal of the traditional values of family, Church and country, by 1933 it had proved itself to such an extent that Hungary was named to host the 4th International Scouting Jamboree.

The story is told of the Exploratory Committee coming to Budapest, which was in the running for hosting the 1933 Jamboree, although the members seemed to favor Prague. My grandfather, dr. Papp Antal, a Hungarian-Armenian, was at the time President of the Hungarian Scouts, and was the one who welcomed them.  Two Armenians were on the Committee, and when my Grandfather wrote his name in Armenian script, that supposedly tilted the scales in Hungary’s favor.

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Erika Papp Faber

It's a Small World/Kicsi a Világ

Kicsi a világ! It’s a Small World!

It should not have come as a surprise when an interviewee spontaneously mentioned a Hungarian expert working in the middle of the Pacific!

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EPF

Did you know...

Dr. Lang György
Did you know...

... that this time we have some medical news, some technical news, and the expansion of the list of Hungarikums?

 

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